Carbon Valley Half Marathon- The After

Words. Sometimes there are none; sometimes there’s too many

I just ran the Carbon Valley Half Marathon for Autism while pushing my wee man. I carried with me names of others with autism for each mile. And your damn right I finished.

Honestly I can’t believe I didn’t cry when I crossed that finish line – probably because I was so pissed to be finishing with 2 flat tires (aka unable to sprint to finish). This race meant SO much to me!!

It was my:

-First official half Marathon

-First stroller race

-First race since son was born

-First race since Leadville DNF (2016)

-Longest run since son born

-Longest stroller run

That’s a lot! A lot to be grateful for. 13.1 miles 2 hours 20 minutes and 13 seconds of grateful. The course is relatively flat: 11 miles of steady climbing and 2 miles to finish. The course is over 50% “smooth” dirt and some pavement.

I went in with a ‘goal’ of averaging about a 10 min mile

Miles run for:

.1 Kyle (my Son’s Father and my Boyfriend)

13 Myself

12 Edan

11 Hunter

10 Annabeth

9 Tedy

8 Silas

7 Atlas

6 Avi

5 Bayla

4 Jack

3 Tyler Jr

2 Jasper

1 Edan (to help me start and finish!)

I am so grateful to have been able to participate in this event. It was so special to me and to share with friends whose hearts it is also very close too. For some awesome shorts of the race and I go check out their YouTube from after the races. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1kI-gU30PgU&feature=youtu.be

SCORE! Budget Saving Deals (Originally Posted on AllWomenAllTrails.com)

Disclaimer: No affiliation with any links provided in the post. No commission being earned.

Backpacking, hiking, running … supposed to be the ‘cheaper’ sports. Just lace up and go. But anyone who’s done even the slightest bit of research knows that it still ain’t cheap.

So with a major trip coming up that requires a major purchase (a pack in my case) how do you save money?

First off, not everything needs to be new. Check out Craigslist and the Facebook marketplace for local used stuff. I recommend staying away from used shoes unless they are a pair someone tried once and just didn’t work for them. If you are an REI member they have Gear Swaps once a year and often have killer deals in their garage sales (now available online too YAY). In CO I also recommend checking out local small gear shops. We have tons scattered around the state. And a newer up and coming bigger store is Feral Mountain Co. (https://feralmountainco.com/)

For new stuff: The biggest money saving thing is to remember that 90% of the time last year’s model is just as good (sometimes better) than this year’s new model. Closeouts can pretty much always be found 25-50% off their original retail price. For example, I’m getting last year’s model of the Deva 80 pack by Gregory. This year’s model retails at $349.99. I’m getting last year’s model for $179.99!! That’s $170 saved just for getting last year’s model.

Previous models are regularly found on discount sites. They often carry clothes and footwear seriously discounted as well. All have reasonable return policies too for when it doesn’t work out. These are my favorite to check out and all run their own sales and coupons too. (No affiliation with any, just sharing)

Sierra.com

Backcountry.com

TheClymb.com

MooseJaw.com

For the newest and latest REI often has great sales, especially around Memorial Day and Fourth of July. Plus their members discount days, 1 year return policy for members, and the opportunity to earn dividends (aka money back), makes them a great choice. Also, most major gear companies run their own spectacular sales. If you can wait for major sale weekends I suggest you do and shop around.

If you’re a blogger with major audience or a professional in the outdoor/fitness industry in some capacity, chances are you probably qualify for some pro discounts too.

The Bell and Bowl: Tips from a physical therapist

I want to take some time to talk about posture, specifically in regards to the pelvis and ribs.

I also want to note how scary it is to share pictures of myself. So yes these are me. No they aren’t photoshopped. No I don’t have a perfect flat stomach. Yes I have scars. But it’s real…and also shows how much posture can change how you look.

While this posture is crucial for running and I’ll mostly be talking about it in regards to that, it’s also important to everyday life.

The way my physical therapist put it is:

Think of the pelvis as a bowl and the rib cage as a bell. When properly aligned the bell and the bowl line up smoothly. When misaligned, more often than not the bell sticks forward and up from the bowl.

Ok great so how do I fix it?

Think about first lining up the bowl. Don’t let your hips tip forward. Use your gluten (your butt) to pull hips back and slightly down.

Then the bell. Draw your belly button back towards your spine and let the bottom of your ribs come down with it.

When running, don’t over puff out your chest. Your back should remain relatively straight. The forward lean of your upper body should be the same angle of lean as your lower legs.

For me I find when I get ready to pick up pace I tend to lift up with my chest. What I’m working on doing instead is to imagine lifting forward while maintaining the bell and the bowl alignment.

Having the image of the bowl and the bell is the best visual cue for this posture I’ve ever had.

Image courtesy mcmillanrunning.com Thanks for the best visual while moving

To work on it becoming my regular posture I start every core exercise I do by making sure I’m lined up. Then when I’m doing my exercises they are being done in the right posture; therefore strengthening the correct way.

It takes practice. Tons of it. And when you’re tired you’ll revert to bad posture. The more you work on it the more it becomes your natural posture. So keep working on it.

Geese Icing

Recently in Colorado it’s been on a pattern of snow 1x/week the be in the 40-50s. It’s gorgeous.

It also makes for some funny running stories

It was 2 days after a good heavy wet snow. About 45 out when I went to start a run. The thought was that the track was probably melted after a day and half in the sun so it would be fine to go run with the stroller and dogs.

Well I was wrong. It was almost completely covered still. At first it didn’t seem too bad. Stroller rolls quite smoothly through snow. But there’s a flock of geese that have been hanging out and their footprints cover about half the track. Each one being a spot that’s melted and refrozen. So a whole bunch of geese foot sized ice pits. Pushing a stroller through this is not only extremely difficult (as is pushing 1/3 of my body weight wasn’t enough) but feels like rolling over a washboard. Needless to say little man wasn’t happy and it wasn’t exactly runnable.

So pause and try again. Half the track is smooth snow without footprints. “I’ll just run U’s,” was my thought. Ok great the first few times but now the stroller tracks are turning into ice grooves. Once again little man not happy.

I decided to head home. Leave the dogs there, pee, grab a drink and try again on the paved trail. Honestly this wasn’t much better. Some areas were dry but about half was ice and slush pits.

Let’s just say it ended up being a painful it at all fun run. And bonus the little man o lay slept for a short bit and was awake before we were home, so no real nap.

Have a funny winter running story?? Share below!!